Desconexión y otros ensayos

As Kenneth Rexroth is known among Spanish readers mainly for his poetic work, his versions of oriental poets and his relationship with the Beat generation, this anthology, prepared by Ken Knabb and Quim Sirera, aims to bring the immense power of the essayist Rexroth to the light of our language. In Knabb’s words: “He is, of course, one of my favorite poets, but as an essayist, I consider his talent to be unparalleled. I don’t know any others so alive, invigorating and forceful, yet with such an open and healthy spirit. These texts remind us of “the original meaning of the word Montaigne’s essay, as meaning: test, examination, experiment, effort to adhere to reality”. The variety of issues addressed and interwoven in them is astounding, as is the vast and heterodox wisdom of their author.

Synopsis of Desconexión y otros ensayos

The following essays are included in this book: Eroticism, Mysticism and Revolution (Ken Knabb) - The Function of Poetry and the Place of the Poet in Society - The Reality of Henry Miller - Mark Twain - A Return to the Origins of Literature - Disconnection: The Art of the Beat Generation - Some Reflections on Jazz as Music, Revolt and Mysticism - Students Take the Lead - Letter from San Francisco - Simone Weil - Martin Buber's Hasidism - Gnosticism The edition presented here is preceded by a formidable introductory essay to Rexroth's work by Ken Knabb.

Desconexión y otros ensayos

Author Kenneth Rexroth
Cover See cover
Editorial Pepitas de calabaza

Kenneth Rexroth

Born in 1905 in the city of South Bend (Indiana, USA) into a family of free thinkers, the life of this self-taught writer has taken on the form of a bridge with distance: a lucid and solid link between two outstanding moments of the 20th century: the social upheavals of the beginning of the century and the youth rebellion of the 1960s. During the 1930s and 1940s, Rexroth played a very active role in many civil rights and anti-war groups (he declared himself a conscientious objector during World War II), and was the main mentor of the cultural and literary ferment that would lead to the so-called "San Francisco Renaissance" after the war. Since the 1950s, he has written poems, plays, essays, and articles on social criticism, translated poetry from seven languages, presented book reviews and programs on independent KPFA radio, and organized for the first time jazz-accompanied poetry readings. He died in Montecito, California, in 1982. Although Kenneth Rexroth is known among Spanish readers mainly for his poetic work, his versions of oriental poets and his relationship with the Beat generation, his essays are unparalleled. A good example of this is Disconnection and other essays (Pepitas, 2009).

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